Friday, 22 June 2018

Taming the echeveria stream

The stream of echeveria elegans has grown slightly since it was first planted.


When is was planted back in 2014 it was almost just individual plants.  Then the great things about echeveria are the rate the spred.


It now takes up the whole space, and come spring it flowers more each year.  The plants also change colour over winter to add a bit more colour.

While the stream is now overflowing, it does mean all the rocks have been obscured.  So it was time to do a bit of clean up.  Here is is before:


The nice things about echeveria, is to sculpt the shape require, simply pull the unwanted plants away form the clump.


I would love to have another echeveria on the lower level, but the E. agavoides keeps rotting as this area is not covered at all.  I am toying filling it with aloe aristata. there would be some variation in colour and the flower season would be extended as just as the echeverias finish the aloes start.

Then there is the bonus of one or two spare plants.


I mayhave to extend the clump in the front to create a new stream where there is more space.

9 comments:

  1. That's crazy pretty and now you have all those plants you can trade for MORE plants!

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    1. Thank you. And I'm not sure I need more plants. Who am I kidding, I do.

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    2. lol yea I understand. My club just had our show n' sale and a few members were like... I think I might not get anything this year. By the end of the show they were carrying out crates of plants.

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  2. Love this! Cleary they love where they are planted.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you. They do seem to be happy.

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  3. The torrent of elegans has been tamed. Looking calm and elegant.

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    1. So it is now an elegant elegans stream

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  4. Your plantstream is indeed elegant.

    Here agavoides is the star planted in the ground. Some E.'s are happy in the ground here; some not. Agavoides is the best--but in your climate, very different results.

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    1. I am so jealous that you can plant agavoides. As you say here they just rot over winter. I am almost tempted to plant a clump and actually cover them, which is all that is needed.

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